Fourth of July Independence from Great Britain

Fourth of July

The Fourth of July is as American as SOUTHWEST SUNSHINE, and if you are one of the families all across the United States that celebrates the birth of America, you may be interested in some little know facts about American Independence Day.

American Independence is born

When the Revolutionary war first started in April of 1775, very few colonists liked the idea of breaking away from Great Britain completely. Those who were in favor were considered radical, even by today’s standards. In the middle of 1776, more colonists started jumping on the bandwagon to independence because of hostility against the motherland.

Fourth of July

The motion to call for the independence of the colonies was introduced by delegate Richard Henry Lee on June 7. After a heated debate, Congress who appointed a committee with five members postponed the vote on the resolution. Members John Adams of Massachusetts, Benjamin Franklin of Pennsylvania, Thomas Jefferson of Virginia, Robert R. Livingston of New York, and Roger Sherman of Connecticut were appointed to draft a formal statement that would justify the break with Great Britain.

Fourth of July

The Continental Congress was in favor of Lee’s Resolution for Independence on July 2, with an almost unanimous vote followed by the signing of the declaration. John Adams wrote a letter to his wife telling her that, “July 2 will be celebrated by succeeding generations as the great anniversary festival.” He also told Abigail that, “The celebrations should include pomp and parade, games, sports, guns, bells, bonfires and illuminations from one end of the continent to the other.” On Jul 4 the the declaration was adopted by the five members of the committee signing and Independence Day was official.

Fourth of July

Early Independence Day Celebrations

Prior to the revolutionary years, colonists would hold yearly celebrations honoring the King’s birthday. The celebrations would traditionally include bell ringing, bonfires, speech making and processions or parades.

In contrast, some colonists celebrated Independence Day by holding a mock funeral for their own King George III.

Fourth of July

Fast forward to modern day Independence Day and you will see Americans doing what the forefathers hand in mind all along. Playing games, enjoying good food, having parades and bonfires with guns, which could be likened to today’s fireworks, and plenty of fun.

This Fourth of July take a moment to remember how America was born and why you have your Independence.

Happy Fourth of July from SOUTHWEST SUNSHINE.